Olivia W. – Jan Rose Kasmir Blog Post 8

Jan Rose Kasmir and I have came into contact yet again, and like always, I could not hold myself back when asking her questions. Understandably, she took my questions in chunks because it would have probably taken all night if she were to try and answer all of them to the best of her ability.
With our latest communication and my final researching on Marc Riboud I have found the information I will use on him for that specific point of my paper. Kasmir informed me about their relationship which seems to be defined as two people from different places in the world, but both fighting for peace in some way. She also was able to tell me how her and Riboud both went to the march for peace in London in response to the war in the Middle East. Kasmir stated that she called Riboud before the march in 2003 to tell him she was attending, but he was not able to commit to the march. However, just a few days before the event he surprised her saying that he would attend to photograph her and the whole march. He even arranged for a videographer to follow her on that day, but I am unable to find any video support on this on the web. I will keep searching because that would be something very interesting to see Kasmir in the midst of what she lives to do: fight for peace.
In the email Kasmir also clarified that defining her and Riboud’s relationship as close would be stretching it a bit, but they do share similar feelings towards peace in the world. As she stated, Riboud “is a man of peace and he recognizes a kindred spirit.” This is proven by the amount of support he has applied to his photography around the world in addition to his support to Kasmir, herself.
In addition to the email, I was able to find a link to a small article, which Kasmir wrote. It restates much of which she has already told me about; however, it is still very interesting to find all of the websites and groups Kasmir has developed a relationship with, as well as how the internet has helped her grow and expand. One new piece of information that I learned from this article is that Marc Riboud was a member of the French Resistance movement, which helped to fight against Nazis during the Second World War.
Lastly, I realized there are some videos of Riboud. After sifting through the ones in French I found one, I could understand, which included Marc discussing much of his career; in particular his career in relation to a group of photos he took of a city, Leeds, UK, which were never developed. These photos, alone, have nothing to do with my paper, yet listening to Riboud talk about them, and seeing more scenes and objects of what he enjoyed to take pictures of helps me greatly to understand him as an artist and photographer. One aspect of the small documentary, which reached out to me, was one point when many older women of Leeds were sitting down trying to recognize who the people in the photographs were. This made me think of that fact that Mark did not know whom Jan Rose Kasmir was until three decades after the photo was taken. She was not his only subject who he did not know. This proves that he was a photographer; just looking for scenes that spoke to him, and his career blossomed from that. He was not taking photographs solely for money, but he was doing so because he was passionate about his work.
http://www.annenbergspaceforphotography.org/the-shot-blog/eye-peace-janrose-woman-marc-ribouds-photo

Screen shot 2013-10-28 at 5.51.47 PMhttp://www.marcriboud.com/marcriboud/accueil.html

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Olivia W. – Jan Rose Kasmir Blog Post 7

Unfortunately, my communication with Jan Rose Kasmir has lacked within the past few weeks; however, I am working to get back in touch with her.  In the mean time I have created a good plan for the shape my paper will take.  Knowing exclusively what I want to write about helps so when I do speak with Kasmir I will have a plan of specific questions I would like to ask her.

Clearly, due to the fact that I have had the wonderful opportunity to communicate with her, and she has been so willing to share her feelings, memories, and beliefs with me a large amount of my paper will be based off of the interviews I have had with her.  I think it will be very important in regards to my part of the paper, immediate impact, to discuss the life of Kasmir.  For instance, I will include the difference between her and the hundreds of other protestors at the March on the Pentagon.  In addition, I am going to spend a smaller amount of time discussing Marc Riboud.  As I have written in my past blog post he is suffering from Alzheimer’s, but even though I cannot get in touch with him it will be important to have his background in the paper.  Especially when discussing how he decided to photograph Kasmir, and when specifically he did so.  This leads to the discussion of Kasmir and Riboud and their relationship.  After the two finally met I realize they shared a connection throughout many years.  This is an aspect, which I am still waiting to hear back from Kasmir about, but I believe the information will be of great help to my paper and to discussing the emotions of the time.  Following that information I am going to include the public and political response.  This has much to do with the March on the Pentagon, and people beginning to share and spread the belief that the war is wrong.

In fact, I have another piece of research, which Dr. Renoff printed off for me and it is about the events that occurred at the Pentagon on 21 October 1967.  The information that is included is interesting because it adds more details to the description of what happened that day.  A statement that caught my eye is a report, which says “a soldier reportedly dropped his rifle, removed his helmet, and walked towards the protestors.  He’d had enough, he was switching sides.”  This, in itself, is a remarkable statement, which will have much affect when describing what the National Guard soldiers were like and how Kasmir viewed them.  In addition to that the research says that “women got the worst of it” referring to the violence between the protestors and the soldiers.  This statement makes me wonder why Kasmir was not terrified when she was talking to the soldiers and was standing so close to their weapons.

In the end, my research paper will also include the popularity of the photo, which I discussed in previous posts.  Also, the message that the photo carried with it to the public, out of all of the war photos this photo is of practicing peace.  The one word that is not associated with war, yet Riboud captured it perfectly.

Olivia — Jan Rose Kasmir — Blog Post 6

This week has been a little cramped, both with furthering my research and communicating with Jan Rose. However, as Dr. Renoff has previously commented I am getting to the point where I have quite a bit of information but I still have not made any sure-footed step in a particular direction. With that said, I am in the midst of planning out what shape my final paper will take in regards to many focus points and important information to include. By the time I receive the next email from Jan Rose I will have a meticulously thought out plan of what more I would like to learn and just how in depth I should be about particular topics, for instance I am looking forward to gaining more knowledge about her and Riboud’s relationship.
In addition to the relationship between Marc and Jan Rose I have received some rather disheartening news in relation to Marc Riboud. Jan Rose informed me in a short email that he has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and his dementia is fairly severe at this point in his life. She told me in the email that I could try to email his wife, but not only did she say I would most likely not hear back I also do not wish to disturb her and their family. Beside the point of hearing of his illness what struck me the most from her short email was the fact that she said she has had to face the fact that she will probably never see him again. This is not only a saddening statement, but it leads me to believe that over the years her and Riboud became somewhat more than a photographer and the girl in the picture. I am anxious to hear how close they truly were. In a few posts previous to this I wrote in regard to a newspaper article I found which included a picture of Jan Rose in London protesting the Iraq war, and Marc Riboud was the photographer of that photo. I discussed how curious I was about whether they were friends or had ever discussed much about this iconic picture, which has had an impact on both of their lives. So, this is definitely an aspect I wish to receive and find enough information about to create a large space in my paper for.
In other news, Dr. Renoff let me borrow his look magazine from 30 December 1969. It is “A Special Look Bonus an Unbelievable Decade: The Sixties;” therefore, with the photo of Jan Rose Kasmir there is no article discussing it more in depth. Yet solely being able to see a true publication of the photo is phenomenal. Also, it proves just how iconic the photo was by the photo directly next to it is of the first footprints on the moon.
I am waiting eagerly to possibly set up a time to skype with Jan Rose Kasmir in the near future so I can really get into the information I most deeply desire for my research and paper. With everyday comes new finds and evidence.

Jan Rose Kasmir Blog Post 6

This week has been a little cramped, both with furthering my research and communicating with Jan Rose. However, as Dr. Renoff has previously commented I am getting to the point where I have quite a bit of information but I still have not made any sure-footed step in a particular direction. With that said, I am in the midst of planning out what shape my final paper will take in regards to many focus points and important information to include. By the time I receive the next email from Jan Rose I will have a meticulously thought out plan of what more I would like to learn and just how in depth I should be about particular topics, for instance I am looking forward to gaining more knowledge about her and Riboud’s relationship.
In addition to the relationship between Marc and Jan Rose I have received some rather disheartening news in relation to Marc Riboud. Jan Rose informed me in a short email that he has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and his dementia is fairly severe at this point in his life. She told me in the email that I could try to email his wife, but not only did she say I would most likely not hear back I also do not wish to disturb her and their family. Beside the point of hearing of his illness what struck me the most from her short email was the fact that she said she has had to face the fact that she will probably never see him again. This is not only a saddening statement, but it leads me to believe that over the years her and Riboud became somewhat more than a photographer and the girl in the picture. I am anxious to hear how close they truly were. In a few posts previous to this I wrote in regard to a newspaper article I found which included a picture of Jan Rose in London protesting the Iraq war, and Marc Riboud was the photographer of that photo. I discussed how curious I was about whether they were friends or had ever discussed much about this iconic picture, which has had an impact on both of their lives. So, this is definitely an aspect I wish to receive and find enough information about to create a large space in my paper for.
In other news, Dr. Renoff let me borrow his look magazine from 30 December 1969. It is “A Special Look Bonus an Unbelievable Decade: The Sixties;” therefore, with the photo of Jan Rose Kasmir there is no article discussing it more in depth. Yet solely being able to see a true publication of the photo is phenomenal. Also, it proves just how iconic the photo was by the photo directly next to it is of the first footprints on the moon.
I am waiting eagerly to possibly set up a time to skype with Jan Rose Kasmir in the near future so I can really get into the information I most deeply desire for my research and paper. With everyday comes new finds and evidence.

Screen shot 2013-10-10 at 8.47.40 PM

The March to the Pentagon 2

In my last post, I tried to give a sense of what the protest was really like, violent for the most part. Somewhere in the 683 arrests, 51 jail terms sentenced, $8,000 in fines, and an untold amount of injuries, some peaceful movements were made. It seems to me that if move of the protestors would have done as Jan Rose Kasmir did, the protest would have been much more powerful.

Even Robert McNamara, who was looking out at the protestors through his office at the Pentagon, said the protestors were doing it all wrong.  Years later, McNamara gave this statement, “They did it all wrong. They way to have done it would to have been Gandhi like. Had they retained their discipline,  they could have achieved their ends.” I agree with McNamara and I could see Jan Rose agreeing as well.

If 100,000 people showed up with flowers peacefully asking soldiers to join them to help end the war, the outcome could have been much better. Jan Rose wanted peace, she wanted to help end the war. Most of these people protesting fought violence with more violence. It is astonishing to me that through all the violence Marc was able to capture this beautiful moment. The picture itself means so much more after researching into the protest.

The protest was a powerful one. After a long day of listening to protestors, a soldier reportedly dropped his rifle, removed his helmet, and walked towards the protestors to join them. Of course this soldier was arrested on the spot for switching sides, but it meant the protest was working! This soldier could have been a soldier that was influenced by Jan Rose or a protestor choosing to act as she did, more than likely not because of the overwhelming violence, but there is still a chance. We like to hope that small things like that can make the biggest difference of all.

The War Within: America’s Battle over Vietnam

Post 5 – JRK

In a previous blog the protest held in the UK, February 2003 was said to be the biggest ever held in the UK; estimating two million attended from organizers estimations (CNN).  Once again Jan Rose showed up to this event. Although I am unable to get a quote directly from Jan Rose at the time the questions that I will be asking her will be asked of her feelings of that protest compared to the one in the 60’s and why Marc Riboud was the one to take the picture. “I have had to accept the fact that I will probably never see home again” (JRK). The previous quote was taken from an email received from Jan Rose Kasmir, within the context it mentions how Marc now suffers with the horrible disease of Alzheimer’s although, I am thrown off by the end of the quote “never see home again” unsure if she meant “him” or if when he took the pictures they meant more than just a picture but a photo that brings her back to what she came from. “There are other pictures of me – there is me as Jesus Christ if you have seen some of the other photos that Marc did; I felt like I was being crucified. At the moment Marc captured that photo – Marc is a Peace Pilgrim as well, he was in the French resistance, he has quite a remarkable history for peace” (JRK) this excerpt is taken from avalonproject.org

In Jan’s interview with Avalon, Jan mentions why she was in London, “When I heard that, the war in Iraq was impending. The reason I went to London to protest was because there it was, Vietnam all over again” (JRK). It seems that she may have wanted Marc to be there to show the world once again the repetitiveness. This could be the reason she asked Marc to take the photo one again, both Jan and Marc hoping it would reach a large community and help the war enthused rethink their actions.

source:

CNN.com

http://www.avalonproject.org/script/jan-rose-kasmir_interview_2010-may.pdf